Can Wireless Charging be a Disruptive Force in the Medical Device Industry?

Nokia has introduced a smart phone that can charge itself wirelessly. (http://www.nokia.com/global/products/lumia/)  It is safe to assume that Nokia uses induction based technology to charge the phone. The phone (equipped with a special receiver) is placed on a mat that generates an electromagnetic field. The phone’s special receiver uses this electromagnetic field to charge the phone’s battery. This technology can only power one device at a time and may generate heat during the charging process.

Recently, IDT and Intel partnered to announce the development of an integrated transmitter and receiver chipset for Intel’s wireless charging technology based on resonance technology. (IDT and Intel Partnership)  Magnetic resonance uses electrical components (a coil and a capacitor) to create magnetic resonance. This resonance can then transmit electricity to the receiver (device to be charged) from the transmitter (charging base). Magnetic resonance can power multiple devices at a time and may not generate excessive heat. A nice summary of this technology is available at Fujitsu Summary of Wireless Charging.

These technologies can be disruptive forces in the medical device industry that rely on battery depletion and replacement for subsequent sales (e.g., pacemakers, defibrillator, and noncardiac pulse generators). The device company that incorporates wireless charging into their devices may minimize replacement procedures for patients (and limiting procedural risk) while at the same time stabilizing their market position. Future device upgrades may be software upgrades and licensing that can be performed wirelessly without need for invasive procedure.

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